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Good Citizens Bronze Awards were held on 11th June at the Annual Show. There were 12 candidates with 9 successful and three not ready. Congratulation to the two club member that were successful: Janice Cotton with Jemma her Lhasa apso and Nicholas Smith with his crossbreed poppy .

 

Good Citizen Gold Awards  held on Sunday 22nd May - Judge Janet Brown
Successful Candidates:
Derek Paige with Cerrys
Stephen Pike with Rossi

Bronze Awards held at the Show on 19th June - Judge Judith Seals
Successful Candidates:

Angela Formaggia with Mushi
Joanne Davidson with Abbi
Jack Pitman with Chablis
Stephen Avery with Sasha
Georgina Krall with Ila
Sue Weller with Tarli
Wendy Keng with Eric
Jonathon Bouthne with Finnion
Jill Riggers with Ula

 Further information on the tests  please contact  Helen Sargent 01243  821533 or email: prizeflyer@tiscali.co.uk or contact or Suzie Hackett

 

 

 

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The Good Citizens Tests are designed by the Kennel Club to encourage owners to be responsible for their dogs and make both them and their pets "Good Citizens".    The dog and its owner are taught everyday common sense ways of keeping a dog.   

The Bronze test is very simple and consists of straight forward questions about the care of the dog and the responsible way to train it.    It includes walking tidily in the street and not jumping up at people or other dogs and generally behaving well in town or country.   The Silver test may be taken once the Bronze has been obtained and likewise the Gold once the Bronze and Silver have been won.  Obviously these tests increase in difficulty, but none are too arduous.    The Gold test does include some  Advanced exercises, but we have people who are only working in Novice obtaining their Gold.     We do run two or three "training" classes specifically for each test in the few weeks before the test.    Owners receive a Kennel Club rosette and certificate and we can send away for a badge for each test at a small cost.   

We think it is the duty of all dog owners to try and keep their pets happy and healthy and to make them acceptable to people who may not normally like or accept dogs.  It is the "bad" dog owners who give the rest of us a bad name"
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BRONZE TEST
Description of Exercises

Exercise 1 - Cleanliness and Identification
Each handler must carry with them some form of “poop scoop” and all dogs must wear a collar and Identification tag complying with the law.  The owner should be reminded that they must always remove any fouling caused by their dog and carry with them some form of "poop scoop”. It is a legal requirement to inscribe the name and the address of the owner on the collar or on a plate or disc attached to it. Furthermore it is a legal requirement to clean up after your dog in public areas and dispose of the bag in an appropriate bin. Notes: 
Even if a dog is microchipped, you can be fined if your dog is not wearing the correct Identification. Telephone numbers are not compulsory but can be very helpful in returning your dog to you in an emergency. Engraved tags can be purchased from the Kennel Club website.

Exercise 2 - Collar and Lead
The object of this exercise is that the handler learns how to put on and take off the collar and lead safely. It is important that the collar and lead are suitable for the type of dog and that the handler is able to fit them correctly. 
Note: A dog that becomes frightened can back out of a loose collar.

Exercise  3 - Walk on Lead
The object of this exercise is for the dog to walk on a lead without distractions.  The handler and dog should walk for approximately 30 paces and include some turns and should demonstrate that this can be done without undue inconvenience and the dog pulling forward or back.  
Note: Competition heelwork is not the aim. An occasional tight lead does not necessarily result in classification “Not Ready”. The dog is permitted to walk on either side of the handler.

Exercise 4 - Control at Door/Gate
The object of this exercise is for a handler and dog to walk through a gate/doorway under control and on a lead. The dog should not pull or be pulled through the gate/doorway. When this exercise commences the dog can be in any position and should wait while the handler opens the gate/door and then proceeds to go through. The handler should then recall the dog through the gate/doorway. While the handler secures the gate, the dog should remain settled.

Exercise 5 - Controlled Walk Amongst People And Dogs
The object is for the handler to remain in control of their dog whilst walking amongst people, dogs and distractions. The handler should walk for approximately 30 paces and include some turns. They should demonstrate that this can be done without undue inconvenience and the dog pulling forward or back. The dog should behave in a quiet, relaxed and controlled manner whilst the handler holds a conversation for one minute. The dog may adopt a stand, sit or down position at this time. This is not a stay exercise. 
Note: Competition heelwork is not the aim. An occasional tight lead does not necessarily result in classification “Not Ready”. The dog is permitted to walk on either side of the handler.

Exercise 6 - Stay on Lead for One Minute
The object of this exercise is that the dog will stay on the spot while the handler moves away for one minute. The handler should remain in sight. The handler should place the dog on lead in any position i.e. stand, sit or down. Upon instruction, having quietly dropped the lead, the handler will move a distance of five paces away for a period of one minute
. Note: This exercise is a test to see if the dog will stay in one place without changing position. The dog must stay in the position that it is left in.

Exercise 7 - Grooming
The object of this exercise is to test the handler’s ability to groom the dog without a struggle. Grooming performed should be relevant to the individual dog, conducted on a lead and should include all parts of the dog’s body. Handlers are required to provide their own grooming equipment. 
Note: Any signs of aggression or nervousness while grooming the dog will be deemed “Not Ready”. It is permissible for small dogs to be groomed on a table.

Exercise 8 - Examination of the Dog
The object of this exercise is to demonstrate that the dog will allow inspection of its body by its handler. This exercise will be carried out on a lead. The examiner will be shown how a handler can examine their own dog. The dog is to be placed for inspection of its mouth, teeth, throat, eyes, ears, stomach, tail and feet when standing, sitting or lying down as required. Other than mild avoidance, the dog should allow inspection without concern.Note: It is the responsibility of training officials to ensure that only suitable dogs take part in this exercise. This is a most important exercise and will require considerable care, expertise and patience on the part of the instructor. 
The average new owner may find this exercise difficult and frustrating.

Exercise 9 - Return to Handler
The object of this exercise is for a dog to return to its handler when instructed to do so. The handler will release the dog from its lead, play with or without a toy, or in some other way distance themselves 10 paces away from the dog. When directed to do so, the handler should call the dog. Having rejoined, the dog should stop close to the handler in any position and the lead shall be replaced.  
Note: The handler is to be advised not to let the dog run uncontrolled in open spaces such as woods, parks and farmland.

Exercise 10 - Responsibility and Care
The object of this exercise is to test the knowledge of the handler on specific subjects relating to owning a dog. The Examiner should construct questions based on section one of the Responsibility and Care leaflet. Topics include – a dog’s needs, illness and responsibilities of ownership. The questions should not be phrased in an ambiguous manner and where necessary, examiners should rephrase the same question in an attempt to bring out the correct answer from the handler. At the start of each training course, in addition to the Description, handlers should be given a copy of the Canine Code and Responsibility and Care leaflet. There should be a discussion period during which the importance of correct socialisation can be explained, problems discussed and advice given on choosing a suitable collar, identity disc and lead. 
Note: Only one numbered item may constitute a question. The handler should be able to give three out of six correct answers from section one of the Responsibility and Care leaflet.

 

 
SILVER TEST
Description of Exercises
 

Exercise 1 - Play with the Dog

The object of this exercise is to demonstrate that the dog will play with its handler. Play adds an extra dimension to a dog’s

life and can be used to make training fun. When instructed to do so the handler should commence to play with the dog. Play

should be under the handler’s control and if it involves articles they should be readily given up by the dog. Note: Play should

be appropriate to the dog under test but should not include play fighting. Formal retrieves will not be deemed as

appropriate play. It is recommended that the Examiner commences with this exercise.
 

Exercise 2 - Road Walk

The object of this exercise is to test the ability of the dog to walk on a lead under control on a public highway. This exercise should

be carried out at a suitable outdoor location and an occasional tight lead is acceptable. The handler and dog should walk along

a pavement, execute a turn, then stop at the kerb where the dog should remain steady and controlled. Having observed the

Highway Code, they should proceed to the other side, turn and continue walking. Distractions should be incorporated such as

passing vehicles or bicycles, people, wheelchairs, prams, pushchairs, etc.

Note: The turns are only tests of ability to change direction.
 

Exercise 3 - Rejoin handler

The object of this exercise is for the dog to remain steady, off lead, while the handler moves away, the dog will then rejoin when

instructed to do so. Having left the dog and moved approximately ten paces away, when directed to do so, the handler should call

the dog. Having rejoined, the dog should stop close to the handler in any position, the lead shall be replaced.

Note: The dog should not rejoin until instructed, but minor anticipation will be acceptable.
 

Exercise 4 - Stay in One Place for Two Minutes

The object of this exercise is that the dog will stay on the spot while the handler moves away for two minutes. The handler should

remain in sight. The handler should place the dog with the lead attached in any position of their choice i.e. stand, sit or down.

Upon instruction, having quietly dropped the lead, the handler will move a distance of five paces away for a period of two minutes.

Note: This exercise is a test to see if the dog will stay in one place without changing position. The dog must stay in

the position it is left in.
 

Exercise 5 - Vehicle Control

The object of this exercise is for the handler to get the dog in and out of a vehicle in a controlled manner. The dog should remain

quiet, relaxed and under control during this exercise. Without pulling, the dog should be taken on lead towards a vehicle and

remain steady whilst the handler opens the vehicle door. The dog should not attempt to get in until instructed but should then

enter willingly and the door should be closed. The handler, Examiner and, if necessary, a driver will get into the vehicle. The

engine should be started and run for a short time to enable the Examiner to assess the effect upon the dog, which at all times,

should remain quiet, relaxed, and under control. The dog will then be instructed to exit in an orderly manner. The handler should

then close the door with the dog calmly under control. Note: Only physically able dogs should be invited to jump into the

vehicle and where appropriate, dogs may be lifted in and out of the vehicle. It is highly recommended that when

travelling, dogs are secure in a vehicle. However, dogs should not be penalised if handlers do not use specific types

of equipment recommended for safe canine travel.
 

Exercise 6 - Come away from Distractions

The object of this exercise is for the handler to remain in control of their dog when there are distractions. The handler should take

the dog, on lead, to a gathering of people with dogs also on lead. When instructed to do so, the lead should be removed and the

handler should walk or run away calling the dog, which should return without delay and be placed on the lead.

Note: Dogs of an unruly nature will not take part in this exercise or be part of the group.
 

Exercise 7 - Controlled Greeting

The object of this exercise is to demonstrate that the dog will not jump up. Should this happen, the handler must be able to

successfully instruct the dog to cease. The Examiner will greet the dog as they may do when entering a house. A dog that

does not jump up will pass. Note: The Examiner should not over incite the dog to jump up. A dog displaying poor

temperament will not pass.


Exercise 8 - Food Manners

The object of this exercise is for the dog to have good manners when aware of food. Food should be handled or consumed while

the dog, on a loose lead, is taken in close proximity to it. The dog should not unduly respond to this temptation, i.e. not to beg

for food or steal. Note: The Examiner should be satisfied that the dog has been taken close enough to the food to be

aware of it.
 

Exercise 9 - Examination of the Dog

The object of this exercise is to demonstrate that the dog will allow inspection of its body by a stranger as might be undertaken by

a veterinary surgeon. The dog on lead will be required to be placed for inspection of its mouth, teeth, throat, eyes, ears and feet

whilst standing, sitting or lying down as required. Other than mild avoidance, the dog should allow inspection without concern.

Note: It is the responsibility of training officials to ensure that only suitable dogs take part in this exercise.
 

Exercise 10 - Responsibility and Care

The object of this exercise is to test the knowledge of the handler on specific subjects relating to owning a dog. The Examiner

should construct questions based on section one and two of the Responsibility and Care leaflet. Topics include – a dog’s needs,

illness, responsibilities of ownership, other responsibilities, children, barking, dogs and stationary vehicles and vehicle travel. The

questions should not be phrased in an ambiguous manner and where necessary, Examiners should rephrase the same question

in an attempt to bring out the correct answer from the handler. At the start of each training course, in addition to the Description,

handlers should be given a copy of the Canine Code and Responsibility and Care leaflet. There should be a session during which

the importance of these topics in every day life situations are discussed. Note: Only one numbered item may constitute

a question. The handler should be able to give six out of eight correct answers from section one and two of the

Responsibility and Care leaflet.

 

GOLD TEST
Description of Exercises

Exercise 1 - Road Walk  
The object of this exercise is to test the ability of the dog to walk on a lead under control on a public highway beside the handler and for the handler to determine the speed of the walk. This exercise should be carried out at a suitable outdoor location and an occasional tight lead is acceptable. The handler and dog should walk along a pavement, execute a turn, then stop at the kerb where the dog should remain steady and controlled. On command they should proceed, observing the Highway Code.  When reaching the other side they should turn and continue walking, making a few changes of pace from normal to slow or fast walking pace. The handler and dog will return across the road to the starting point of the exercise. Distractions should be incorporated such as passing vehicles or bicycles, people, wheelchairs, prams, pushchairs, etc.  
Note: The turns are only tests of ability to change direction.

Exercise 2 - Return to Handler’s Side
The object of this exercise is to be able to bring the dog back under close control during a lead free walk. With the dog off lead and not less than 10 paces away, upon instruction, the dog will be called back to the walking handler’s side and both should continue together for approximately ten paces.  
Note: A dog moving loosely at the handler’s side, under control, is quite acceptable and there is no requirement for a halt to complete the exercise.

Exercise 3 - Walk Free Beside Handler
The object of this exercise is for the dog to be kept close to the handler’s side as may be necessary on a walk in the park. This is a test of control whilst walking with a dog off lead beside its handler for approximately 40 paces. Competition heelwork is not the aim, but is acceptable. Therefore, it is only necessary for the dog to be kept loosely beside the handler. Two changes of direction will take place and there will be the distraction of another handler passing with a dog on a lead. Upon instruction the handler will attach the lead to finish to the test.  
Note: Changes of direction are right and left turns without formality.

Exercise 4 - Stay Down in one Place
The object of this exercise is that the dog will stay down on the spot while the handler moves away for two minutes both in and out of sight. This stay will be tested off lead and handlers should placetheir dogs in the down position. During the test the handler will be asked to move out of sight for approximately half a minute. While in sight handlers will be approximately ten paces away from their dog.  Note: This exercise is a test to see if the dog will stay down in one place without changing position
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Exercise 5 - Send the Dog to Bed
The object of this exercise is to demonstrate control such as might be required in the home. The handler may provide the dog’s bed, blanket, mat, or an article of clothing, etc.  The handler should place the dog’s bed in a position determined by the Examiner. The handler will stand approximately ten paces from the bed. Upon instruction, the handler will send the dog to bed where the dog will remain until the Examiner is satisfied the dog is settled.  Note:  The dog is not being sent to bed in disgrace. Where possible this exercise should be tested indoors. The bed used should be suitable for the dog under test and no inducement e.g. toys or food should be used during this exercise
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Exercise 6 - Stop the Dog
The object of this exercise is for the handler to stop the dog at a distance in an emergency situation. With the dog off lead and at a distance, not less than approximately ten paces away, the handler will be instructed to stop the dog on the spot in any position.  
Note: The dog should be moving and is expected to respond straight away to the stop command, but if moving at speed, will be allowed a reasonable distance to come to a stop.

Exercise 7 - Relaxed Isolation
The object of this exercise is for the dog to be content when left in isolation. During such times the dog should not become agitated, unduly stressed or defensive. The handler should fasten the dog to an approximate two metre line and then move out of sight for between two - five minutes as directed. Alternatively, the dog may be left in a room on its own, provided undetected observation can take place. Examiners should choose appropriate venues when conducting this exercise. Any number of dogs may be tested at the same time provided they are isolated at different locations. It is acceptable for the dog to move around during isolation, however should the dog whine, howl, bark, or indulge in any disruptive activities it should not pass this exercise.
Note: Dogs should be tested for their relaxed demeanour in isolation without any prior controls being imposed by the handler. This is not a stay exercise but handlers may settle their dogs before leaving. This is a practical test and no inducement e.g. blankets, toys or food should be used during this exercise.

Exercise 8 - Food Manners
The object of this exercise is for the dog to be fed in an orderly manner. The handler will offer food to the dog either by hand or in a bowl. The dog must wait for permission to eat. After a three - five second pause, the handler will be asked to give the dog a command to eat.  
Note: The dog should not eat until given permission, however if attempting to do so, it is acceptable for the handler to restrain the dog by voice alone.

Exercise 9 - Examination of the Dog
The object of this exercise is to demonstrate that the dog will allow inspection of its body by a stranger as might be undertaken by a veterinary surgeon. The dog on lead will be required to be placed for inspection of its mouth, teeth, throat, eyes, ears, stomach, tail and feet whilst standing, sitting or lying down as required. Other than mild avoidance, the dog should allow inspection without concern. Note: It is the responsibility of training officials to ensure that only suitable dogs take part in this exercise.

Exercise 10 - Responsibility and Care
The object of this exercise is to test the knowledge of the handler on specific subjects relating to owning a dog. The Examiner should construct questions based on section two and three of the Responsibility and Care leaflet. Topics covered include - other responsibilities, children, barking, dogs and stationary vehicles, vehicle travel, health, worming, the Country Code, miscellaneous, frightening, out of control, biting and psychology of learning. The questions should not be phrased in an ambiguous manner and where necessary, Examiners should rephrase the same question in an attempt to bring out the correct answer from the handler. At the start of each training course, in addition to the Description, handlers should be given a copy of the Canine Code and Responsibility and Care leaflet. There should be a session during which the importance of these topics in every day life situations are discussed. 
Note: Only one numbered item may constitute a question. The handler should be able to give eight out of ten correct answers from section two and three of the Responsibility and Care leaflet.

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 
   
 

 
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